Music Interaction, Not Music Video

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NPR recently posted an interview they had with an EP of Radical Media, talking about the fall and rise of music videos, now that videos are being made by the artists themselves on video platforms like YouTube. The article was inspired by the success of Pharrell Williams’ “music video,” “Happy“, and how Billboard’s Hot 100 takes YouTube plays into account of measuring success.

The article focuses too much on a ‘classic’ style of music video, and failed to beg the question of what is a music video, and skipped over the most revolutionary band of music videos in the last decade: OK Go (maybe just because there weren’t any new releases in 2013).

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Sprout Social Growth In Social Networks Vs. User Engagement

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Social Media Engagement Is Growing

In a new published report by Sprout Social, we see that although all signups and uses of the major social networks is growing, the engagement grows exponentially. This shows that a brands presence on these networks online is no longer a passive experience, where users simply consume what is pushed to them in their networks, but they want to engage and interact with what’s being provided to them.

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Nielsen On Connected Devices While Watching TV

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Nielsen published a new report about US consumers use of connected devices, including how most have four devices, and spend 60 hours a week consuming media across them all.

84% of smartphone and tablet users admit to using their devices “as second screens” while watching TV, which is the key takeaway from this study. Viewers want to engage with what they’re watching on TV, whether it’s to read up on people or topics in the show, purchase items they see on screen, or share their thoughts (it’s hard to find a program that doesn’t have a Twitter hashtag in the bottom of the screen).

In the 2013 Superbowl, Twitter was mentioned in 50% of commercials, compared to Facebook’s 8% and Google Plus’ 0. However, the hashtag replaced platform-centric mentions, and was generally in 57% of all ads, which linked to campaigns across each network. For major cultural events, it’s important to recognize that your viewers want to engage with your brand, for good or bad, so it’s as important as ever to have a strong presence to provide them with what they need.

5 Steps To Optimize Your Video For The Web

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Videos Can Be Optimized Almost As Well As Text

Video has always been a complicated matter on the web, as it demands dedication from the creator to make something good, time commitment from the audience to watch, speed and power from both the web server and user-end, and labor from search engine crawlers to understand if it’s what their users want. Text is easy to navigate, but audio files and 30 pictures per second take work. A decade ago, video was purely an experience piece for your users, but now it can be just as strong of a content tool as any article of text.
That is, because text is still an integral part of video, and there are a few standard areas where you can control the text associated with your video. And any expert in video content will be sure to check off each of these steps, as this represents 80% of the results for engaging video. Here are a few of the basic key points in best optimizing your videos.
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Cleaning Up Your Footage

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Over the years of creating videos from various formats and sources, and especially from various cameras, there’s a chain of command I like to implement in the workflow to get the best quality out of all assets. Especially when working with DSLR footage (when the imaging sensor was not particular designed for shooting video), part of the process is just “cleaning” the footage to make it look better. Here is my system, particularly for Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects (though these filters work on any other editing system).

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Image Sensors: When Bigger Is Better

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Over the last few years of filming sit-down interviews with some interesting people, I’ve been fortunate enough to be able to use a couple of different video cameras, depending on the needs of the project. Every camera I’ve handled has delivered what I expected it to deliver (mostly because I was able to test them prior to task at hand), but I wanted to explore one of the most important fundamentals of choosing the best camera for the job: the imaging sensor. Here, I’ll go through three different cameras, and why you should prefer a dedicated “video” camera when shooting video, over a video-capable DSLR.

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